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Lenticular Conversation


Mike Brown
 

I posted my recent interview with Alexey Polyakov on YouTube as part of my Lenticular Conversations series. Alexey is the founder & CEO of Triaxes Vision. His company created the 3DMasterKit and StereoTracer software that many people use to make 3D lenticulars. I hope those of you will an interest in 3D lenticular enjoy it.

Michael

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DmJlaQbiG0


Depthcam
 

Excellent interview, Michael !

However, I have a different viewpoint in regards the future.  You suggest that, if the "Looking Glass" were on a phone, then everyone would appreciate 3D.  But phones with 3D displays have been around for over ten years and that hasn't made many people convert to 3D.  The Hydrogen One itself with its multi-view light field display was a commercial failure.

I think the explanation is that most people won't spend a large amount for 3D unless the content is of great interest to them.  And in such a case. a lenticular print may actually be a more economical way to have that 3D image.  This is also why people are more likely to pay a small amount for a stereo card in a cardboard viewer than to buy an expensive new phone just to view of a few of their pictures.  In other words, in spite of the new digital technology, the traditional analog methods still remain the most economical.

Francois


Mike Brown
 

Francois,

All good points that you made. I guess my thought was the phone is now the medium (not hardcopy) and probably will be for some time. You no longer see people passing around prints like they did 20 years ago. Now people say, "let me show you a picture" and they start swiping their phone screen. Facebook did something really interesting with their introduction of Facebook 3D (2D+Z). I bet there are now more people making Facebook 3D images than there are people who have shot traditional stereo photography since the introduction of that process 150 years ago. My comment about the Looking Glass was more about the idea of having a true lightfield display on a phone with 3D viewing from any angle - something that does not currently exist. Maybe such a thing will become available in the future, but even if it does - people still have to want it - and so far, there doesn't seem to be much general public desire for 3D imagery. I always respect and appreciate your thoughts Francois. Thank you for your comment

Michael


robert mcafee
 

Michael, great interview with Triaxes, but try as I might I could never fuse the left and right images of the video!    😁


Depthcam
 

> You no longer see people passing around prints like they did 20 years ago.

I can't fully agree with that either.  True that many people have their pictures on their phones.  But the popularity of phone printers (such as the Canon IVY) has skyrocketed - as well as the popularity of Instax instant print cameras.  There is a whole range of these cameras.  Kids really like the prints.  So I think people cam appreciate 3D prints.  And keep in mind that Brian May has inspired a lot of younger people to get into 3D and use his OWL viewer to view their prints.  Therefore, although I agree that prints are no longer as popular as they use to be, they still fill a need for many people - including the younger generation.

Francois