Nintendo 3DS glasses free with eye tracking as an enticement to take up 3D #viewing #futureOf3D


Michael Levine
 

I think the topic "Another formerly popular 3D system discontinued. Why?" was originally about the demise of the 3DS. It morphed into a much lengthier and at times challenging discourse and I think my post got lost in it.

We call for new members to the stereo community and note there are photographers using faux stereo on Instagram and elsewhere who need to be informed of the “true” 3D they are actually creating.

I wrote about how I rediscovered the New 3DS XL and why it has merit as a low cost vehicle for glasses free viewing to entice new 3d recruits and especially the social media wobble photographers and sbs etc to 2 pic glasses free eye tracking easy sweet spot 3d for them and their friends.

As I type this I look down at my New 3DS XL and every time regardless of position there is a 3D view without any effort at all. The Commander tablet to my right requires me to sit at a limited set point to view 3d.

I should point out that I have a number of glasses free tablets, phones and the W3. My view is that none are as easy for the uninitiated to view with an eye tracking camera on the 3DS and the resolution is more than acceptable for this introductory purpose. There will no doubt be those who do not agree.

I have not checked if something similar has been posted before but in any event an easy non technical project may be due for revival anyway.

1. A first time only requirement is
a) enable SBM1 file share in Windows Features in Windows Start.
b) in system settings/data management on your Nintendo use the microSD management feature which effectively sets it up as discoverable on wifi - very easy and I suggest you give it the name Nintendo when asked.
2.Create a folder in Windows and name it to Nintendo's requirements (such as 102NIN02 but also see below for more).
3. Gather your mpo's (200 works fine - 2000 may not) and multi convert with Stereo Photo Maker to 1280x480 - under 80mb mostly and store them in the folder you created.
4. Use a file renamer to rename your files to Nintendo's requirements (such as ADJI0001.MPO to ADJI0020.MPO etc but also see below for more)
5. Open the Nintendo under network in windows explorer
6. In explorer drag the folder you created onto the DCIM folder on the Nintendo card

View your photos using the Nintendo camera choosing slideshow all with random or chronological order. In settings you can set

a) 9 music types or mute background
b) Ken Burns zoom or not
c) 3 or 10 seconds or 1 or 3 minutes or rapid duration for each photograph
d) shutter, dissolve, page turn, wash or random mix for the transition

If all the above resulting slideshow does not impress your non 3d friends nothing will!


Some detail on files and folders
I had 2000 files and 7 folders in a previous attempt with very difficult manual transfer before I realised about the microSD management.

Interestingly I found 2131 pictures in just one folder so I am not sure you need more than one folder.

Here is a list of my folder and file numbers to assist (I am unable to fathom any reason behind the numbering).

FOLDERS.

102NIN02 through to 107NIN07 (7 in all).

FILES.

The file naming convention in folder 102NIN02 was

ADJI0001.MPO to ADJI0020.MPO.

ADJP0001.MPO to ADJP0062.MPO.

ADJU0002.MPO to ADJU2050.MPO.

When I took new photos the convention was 100NIN03 for the folder, and HNI_0001 and following for the pics.


JackDesBwa|3D
 


My view is that none are as easy for the uninitiated to view with an eye tracking camera on the 3DS and the resolution is more than acceptable for this introductory purpose.

As far as I know, there are two models (plus the XL variants).
The model with eye-tracking is named "New Nintendo 3DS".

It seems that they all have a 400×240 pixels top screen (per eye in 3D mode), which sounds very low definition nowadays but gives surprisingly enjoyable pictures in the old model I have (not as defined as on HD autostereoscopic phone or 3DTV of course)

(I am unable to fathom any reason behind the numbering)

It seems to follow the "design rule for camera file system" of the "Japan electronic industry development association" with a "Digital Camera IMages (DCIM)" folder in the root in which some "100ABCDE" folders (100-999 followed by 5 alphanumeric uppercase letters or underscore) regroup images named "ABCD0001.XXX" (4 alphanumeric uppercase letters or underscore followed by 0001 to 9999 and the extension).
The exact name probably does not matter as long as it follows the rules (a subset given above)

JackDesBwa


Michael Levine
 

I think the 3d screen is 800x240. But that belies the experience which is much better than the numbers suggest. And I have tried it on reluctant 3d viewers who find the correct point of view difficult and almost an imposition on the the Commander etc but have no difficulty with the 3dsxl and actually spend time looking at the photos. 

On Tue, 29 Sep 2020 at 9:09 pm, Stereopix Net <contact@...> wrote:

My view is that none are as easy for the uninitiated to view with an eye tracking camera on the 3DS and the resolution is more than acceptable for this introductory purpose.

As far as I know, there are two models (plus the XL variants).
The model with eye-tracking is named "New Nintendo 3DS".

It seems that they all have a 400×240 pixels top screen (per eye in 3D mode), which sounds very low definition nowadays but gives surprisingly enjoyable pictures in the old model I have (not as defined as on HD autostereoscopic phone or 3DTV of course)

(I am unable to fathom any reason behind the numbering)

It seems to follow the "design rule for camera file system" of the "Japan electronic industry development association" with a "Digital Camera IMages (DCIM)" folder in the root in which some "100ABCDE" folders (100-999 followed by 5 alphanumeric uppercase letters or underscore) regroup images named "ABCD0001.XXX" (4 alphanumeric uppercase letters or underscore followed by 0001 to 9999 and the extension).
The exact name probably does not matter as long as it follows the rules (a subset given above)

JackDesBwa











--
M and J


jim fortaleza
 

One more toy to add to my 3D tool kit. So far I have a W3, an Oculus GO and a useless Stereo Viewer (for viewing SBS pics on a monitor). If this device works as described it will be used often.

Jim Davidson


Depthcam
 

The main reason I took an interest in the 3DS was that I figured so many people already had one that they surely would want to view 3D pictures on it if they knew how.  Let's face it, the 3DS even has a built-in 3D camera.  Sounds ideal , right ?  But no !

People who buy the 3DS buy it for one sole reason - gaming !  They never even consider the built-in camera or the fact that it is 3D.  Anyhow, when I bought some used 3DS's some years ago, I was amused to find some still had an SD card in it with a few 3D shots taken by the owners.  The shots were totally horrendous !  It doesn't help that the camera resolution is quite poor, but the people taking the pictures appeared to not have any idea how to use a camera.

But yes, I agree in principle that the 3DS "should" be a good introduction to 3D photography.  But the truth of the matter is that most 3DS owners don't care.

In regards the eye-tracking on the new 3DS, it's true that it may make it easier for some to look at the display in 3D.  However I never had a situation when I showed content on my regular glasses-free phones or tablets where people had a problem picking up the sweet spot.  So I never felt that eye-tracking would be a game changer.  Although I have several 3DS's, I never bought the "new" model with eye-tracking.  I do however have a phone that uses SuperD technology and that too has very efficient eye-tracking.  However, the truth is I hardly ever use it simply because eye-tracking doesn't add that much for me.  I think the advantage of eye tracking  becomes more obvious when watching a movie where one might have a tendency to move in and out of the sweet spot.

But the poor resolution of the 3DS makes it a less than ideal choice unless one is a gamer.

Francois


forum@trivision3d.com
 

JMH/trivision3d: Personally I bought a second hand Nintendo wide 3Ds for its possibility of augmented reality and for my french "museum" of 3D techniques. There were indeed proprietary photos.
What I found remarkable on the N3Ds for children and for adults with small eye gaps and oculomotors little or not tonic (which can give a background doubled by the transformations of the 3D volume for them very stretched) ... it is the slider that allows to reduce the positive parallax (up to 2D), so each user can have the 3D that suits him. I was surprised that this reduction of positive parallax is done without moving the volume further forward (without floating window).
Almost a pity, it would have been enough to make a fuzzy border retracting the frame, so the window would have been more annoying to violate... and there again Nintendo could have put a second slider to set the negative parallax to zero... it would have allowed a total control and it would have been remarkable.
These settings (at least the one for positive parallax) should be on all 3D diffusion systems... 3DTV, tablet, 3D smartphone, 3D video projector, 3D web viewer, VR headset. Everyone would thus have his own 3D orthostereoscopic 3D and no more infusible duplicate backgrounds. Nobody would see the same 3D volumes.
For the eyes tracking, I got a Toshiba Qosmio 3D laptop ... image jump of one second to recode behind the parallax barrier rather annoying to follow the head and the gamers finally preferred 2D!
A Forum Trivision3d is coming to speak about.

Translated from French with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)