A Stereo Realist reference in an auto article. #historical


 

In a story about the Nash-Healey, a 1950s Anglo-American sports
car, there is a mention of the small role played by a Stereo
Realist camera:

"Healey scheduled a meeting in Detroit with Ed Cole, chief
engineer at Cadillac, and boarded the Queen Elizabeth, bound
for New York. While crossing the Atlantic, Healey noticed a
very fat man using a 3D camera on deck. The late 1940s saw
stereo photography gain popularity with the introduction of
the Stereo Realist 35mm 3D camera and related slide viewers.
Healey was a photography buff and approached the gentlemen
to ask about the camera. It turned out that both men ran
car companies. The rotund photographer was George W. Mason,
president of Nash-Kelvinator, and he invited Healey to join
him at dinner."

That's the only mention of the Realist in this lengthy article
about the history of this sports car. If interested in the
topic, find the rest here:

https://www.hagerty.com/articles-videos/articles/2019/12/17/nash-healey-was-a-car-ahead-of-its-time

...BC


autothreads@sbcglobal.net
 

Small world. That's my article on the Nash-Healey sports car. Thanks for posting about it. A while back I contacted George Mason's grandson to see if the family happened to have any of his 3D slides but they're lost to time.

Here's another piece I did about the history of 3D and Virtual Reality in the auto industry: https://www.hagerty.com/articles-videos/articles/2019/09/16/virtual-reality-in-the-automotive-world

Ronnie Schreiber


John Rupkalvis
 

Great article, Ronnie.  A lot of stereoscopic history in the automobile industry.  I have a lenticular 3-D picture sponsored by Nash in the early 1950s.  

That list of commercial View-Master reels does not include one that StereoMed, Inc. produced for the Schering pharmaceutical company.  That one was distributed to medical doctors in a box that included a V-M viewer.  A dermatologist, Dr. Irving Katz MD, is the president of StereoMed.  I am vice president of StereoMed and worked with Irving on the photography and design of that reel, as well as the StereoMed 3-D cameras that were used to create the images.  

John A. Rupkalvis
stereoscope3d@...

Picture


On Fri, Dec 20, 2019 at 12:14 PM autothreads@... <autothreads@...> wrote:
Small world. That's my article on the Nash-Healey sports car. Thanks for
posting about it. A while back I contacted George Mason's grandson to
see if the family happened to have any of his 3D slides but they're lost
to time.

Here's another piece I did about the history of 3D and Virtual Reality
in the auto industry:
https://www.hagerty.com/articles-videos/articles/2019/09/16/virtual-reality-in-the-automotive-world

Ronnie Schreiber






David Starkman
 

Susan and I loved this story about the Stereo Realist and the Nash-Healey sports car. Attached is a 3-D photo of one of the Nash-Healey models circa 1954 (it says Nash LeMans) from our digital collection, taken by the late father of some friends of ours, Sam Biren.  Enjoyed both articles!
By the way, besides making Stereo Realist slides to show off their cars, GM also had a custom viewer made just for them called the "Multi-Viewer" that took a custom card with 6 slightly wider than Realist format 3D slides that would roll down through the viewer in sequence. See attached photos.  Best to you all for the holidays - DDDavid


David Starkman
 

One small correction to my last post. The GM Stereo Viewer was called the "Multi-Vue" not "Multi-Viewer". - DDDavid